How to Find a Hostname for an IP Address

Sometimes we need to find the name of server using its IP address. Below are the steps that can help us finding the same:

How to Find a Hostname for an IP Address:

Step 1: Open the "Command Prompt" as Administrator.

Step 2: Type "nbtstat -A %ipaddress%" at the command prompt, substituting the IP address for "%ipaddress%."

Example: nbtstat –A 125.125.126.127

Step 3: Review the results and find the NETBIOS table. Locate a row where the type is "UNIQUE" and find the hostname of the computer in the "Name" column for that row as shown below:

Getting Windows services information using VBScript

Many times, we need to check if particular service is running or not on some particular server. Then we need to log into that server to check it.

To simplify it, I wrote a VBScript that will get the information for you from that server without login to the server.

Important NOTE: To get the service information, you need to run this VBScript with the account that has admin rights on the server for which you need the service information.

VBScript will point to below screen: Enter server name and click Ok.

clip_image002

It will create Service_Info.txt at the root location from where you are running the script.

Format of output log file:

Service Name::- Application Experience Lookup Service

Description::- Processes application compatibility lookup requests for applications as they are launched.

Status::- Running

Startup Type ::- Auto

Log on as ::- LocalSystem

VBScript Content:

'##############################################################
'#
'# Language     VBscript
'# 
'# Author       Mohd Aslam
'# Date         28.06.2011
'# Description  This script does following actions:
'#              1) it asks user to input the name of server 
'#                 whose service info you want
'#              2) It then creates Service_Info.txt file in 
'#                 the directory of the script file.
'#
'#############################################################

Dim oFSO              'File Scripting Object
Dim sScriptLog        'output log filename
Dim oScriptLog        'Script output file object
Dim oWshShell         'Windows Scripting Shell object

sScriptLog =    ".\Service_Info.txt"

Set oWshShell = WScript.CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
Set oFSO = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")

Set oScriptLog =  oFSO.CreateTextFile (sScriptLog,True)
oScriptLog.Close()
Set oScriptLog = oFSO.OpenTextFile(sScriptLog,8)

InputServerName = InputBox("Enter the name of server whose service information you want:","Service Information") 

strComputer = InputServerName
Set objWMIService = GetObject("winmgmts:" _
    & "{impersonationLevel=impersonate}!\\" & strComputer & "\root\cimv2")
Set colRunningServices = objWMIService.ExecQuery _
    ("Select * from Win32_Service")    
    
For Each objService in colRunningServices          
     oScriptLog.WriteLine "Service Name::- " & objService.DisplayName  & VbCrLf 
     oScriptLog.WriteLine "Description::- " & objService.Description  & VbCrLf 
     oScriptLog.WriteLine "Status::- " & objService.State & VbCrLf
     oScriptLog.WriteLine "Startup Type ::- " & objService.startmode & VbCrLf
     oScriptLog.WriteLine "Log on as ::- " & objService.startname & VbCrLf     
     oScriptLog.WriteLine "-------------------------------------------" & VbCrLf     
Next

                               –End of Article–

Blade Servers

Many times we came across this word “Blade Server”….

 What are they?

 A blade server is a server chassis housing multiple thin, modular electronic circuit boards, known as server blades. The blades are literally servers on a card, containing processors, memory, integrated network controllers, an optional fiber channel host bus adaptor (HBA) and other input/output (IO) ports.

 Blade servers allow more processing power in less rack space, simplifying cabling and reducing power consumption. According to a SearchWinSystems.com article on server technology, enterprises moving to blade servers can experience as much as an 85% reduction in cabling for blade installations over conventional 1U or tower servers. With so much less cabling, IT administrators can spend less time managing the infrastructure and more time ensuring high availability.

 Each blade typically comes with one or two local ATA or SCSI drives. For additional storage, blade servers can connect to a storage pool facilitated by a network-attached storage (NAS), Fiber Channel, or iSCSI storage-area network (SAN). The advantage of blade servers comes not only from the consolidation benefits of housing several servers in a single chassis, but also from the consolidation of associated resources (like storage and networking equipment) into a smaller architecture that can be managed through a single interface.

 A blade server is sometimes referred to as a high-density server and is typically used in a clustering of servers that are dedicated to a single task, such as:

 File sharing

Web page serving and caching

SSL encrypting of Web communication

The transcoding of Web page content for smaller displays Streaming audio and video content Like most clustering applications, blade servers can also be managed to include load balancing and failover capabilities.